There is a justifiable dust-up in the comments on my guest post on WhipUp about one of the quilts shown in the post. I don’t disagree with the fundamental thrust of these comments.

Unfortunately, if one assumes what one assumes about quilters, then I agree that you’d be offended by seeing the n-word on a quilt. The work needs greater context than what is presented over there. Race and racism are hard to confront without the use of cotton. But maybe the context presented below can help?

.
.
.
.

Yes, you’ll see the n-word if you scroll any further.

.
.
.
.

I am a black woman who is confronted with this word daily. Growing up in the Deep South helped me to develop a thicker skin so that I don’t die inside every time I am called it, but I can’t deny the impact of the word on me. I made this quilt a year ago in protest of the general relative acceptance of the use of this word in my community here in the North. Powerless to speak out for many reasons, this quilt was my only outlet for self-expression at the time. And the relief the expression brought was much-needed even though I only showed the quilt to a select few.

inevitable

No matter how I wrap myself in this quilt, the label cannot be covered. It is the way my community views me and others who look like me. And there is no way for me to avert my eyes. I cannot deny the existence of this word and the hateful intent in its use against me.

This is my reality.

Now. There are zillions of other questions one should ask about the language and about why it might be a little more okay if this quilt is made by a black woman.

ETA: *comments are closed.*